What Does a Legal Cashier Do? Choosing the Right Law Job

The legal cashier’s job can be ideal for someone who finds the idea of working for a solicitors or law firm appealing but doesn’t have the experience or desire to work directly on legal matters. Normally a legal cashier is responsible in one form or another for the finances of the company. As the financial needs of solicitors and law firms are quite unique, a niche has opened up for those with the skills and expertise to carry out these kinds of jobs.

There are a number of different jobs which could be described as a legal cashier:

Legal Accountant – The responsibilities of a legal accountant are in many ways similar to a traditional accountant however there are some distinct difference unique to the industry. For example the large transfers of money for house purchases and legal fees are quite different to that of a traditional business. Though the tasks carried out by a legal accountant may differ from other industries many of the skills required to carry out the role are quite transferable.

Financial Controller – typically a financial controller has a lot more strategic role than a legal accountant, they might not be as involved in the day to day, invoices, payments and bank reconciliations but are still heavily involved in how a legal firm manages it finances.

Accounts Manager – This might be a role for someone working within a legal firm who has extensive accounts experience yet isn’t a qualified accountant. They don’t have the legal ability to carry out accounts like their professionally qualified colleague but might still carry out very similar tasks on a day to day basis.

Practice Manager– a far more administrative role typically, though it may still involve aspects of a finance common to most legal cashier roles. A Practice manager would normally have responsibility for the teams responsible for the administration and non legal functions of the firm.

Legal cashiers can also often be given the responsibilities within a company beyond the financial. These tasks often include

Marketing– while legal firms might not instantly seem like they require a great deal of marketing just like every business they need new customers. For most firms they would never reach the size where they could afford or justify a full time member of staff dedicated to marketing the firm. However often the responsibility of attracting new customers can be passed to someone with the appropriate skills. Often a legal cashier has just the right mix of abilities and enthusiasm to be given the task of marketing.

HR – the responsibility for human resources is another important part of a business which a small legal firm may not be able to dedicate a member of staff. As legal cashiers often manage a large number of the firm’s staff often HR can be allocated to them.

Administration – the amount of paper work and administration that a team of practicing solicitor can create is surprising. Consequently there is a team of administrators at most firms dedicated to organizing the firm and their work. As legal cashiers develop through their career they can often.

Source by Robert Proctor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *